20 Weird Halloween Traditions Around The World

Halloween, a holiday rooted in ancient Celtic traditions, has evolved over centuries into a global celebration of the eerie and the mysterious. While the United States may be most famous for its extravagant Halloween festivities, countries worldwide have unique and often peculiar ways of marking this spooky occasion.

In this blog post, we will explore 20 weird Halloween traditions from the United States and various countries, offering a glimpse into the fascinating diversity of Halloween traditions around the world.

Halloween traditions from the United States:

1) Howl-o-ween (Park City, Utah)

Park City, Utah, takes a unique approach to Halloween with its annual “Howl-o-ween” celebration. In this quirky event, dogs and their owners dress up in elaborate costumes and parade down Main Street.

It’s a delightful sight to see, with everything from canine vampires to four-legged superheroes participating in the festivities. The event promotes pet-friendly fun and encourages the community to come together to celebrate the holiday in an adorable and heartwarming way.

2) Witches’ Magical Circle (Salem, Massachusetts)

Salem, Massachusetts, is infamous for its historical association with witch trials, and it fully embraces its spooky past during Halloween. One of the most unusual traditions here is the creation of the “Witches’ Magical Circle” on Salem Common.

This massive circle is constructed with thousands of pumpkins, each carved with intricate designs and lit with candles. Visitors are invited to walk through this enchanting display, which adds an eerie and mystical ambiance to the city’s Halloween celebrations.

3) All Souls Procession (Tucson, Arizona)

In Tucson, Arizona, Halloween is more than just a night of candy and costumes; it’s a time to remember and honor loved ones who have passed away. The All Souls Procession is a beautiful and moving event where participants create elaborate, colorful, and often surreal costumes and masks.

They then gather to march through the streets, carrying photographs of deceased friends and family members. This unique tradition combines elements of Mexican Dia de los Muertos and American Halloween, creating a poignant and memorable experience.

4) Zombie Crawl (Denver, Colorado)

Denver’s Zombie Crawl is a testament to the popularity of the zombie genre in American culture. Thousands of participants gather to transform themselves into gruesome, undead creatures and roam the streets in a massive zombie horde each year.

It’s a macabre and playful way to celebrate Halloween, with participants showcasing their creativity in the art of zombie makeup and costume design. This event proves there’s no shortage of zombie enthusiasts in the Mile-High City.

5) Fantasy Fest (Key West, Florida)

Fantasy Fest in Key West, Florida, is a week-long extravaganza of wild costumes, elaborate floats, and uninhibited revelry. While it technically takes place in late October, this Halloween-inspired festival is known for its outrageous and surreal atmosphere.

Participants dress in everything from mermaids and pirates to political satire, and the grand parade down Duval Street highlights the event. Fantasy Fest allows people to embrace their fantasies and immerse themselves in a world of uninhibited self-expression.

6) Mischief Night (New Jersey)

Mischief Night, which occurs on the night before Halloween, has a long history in the United States, particularly in New Jersey. It’s a night when young pranksters engage in various mischievous activities, such as toilet-papering houses, egging cars, ringing doorbells, and running away.

While not an organized event, it’s a tradition that has endured for generations, combining youthful rebellion and Halloween mischief.

7) Spotting Bats

Across the United States, especially in rural areas, there’s a quirky tradition of going bat-spotting on Halloween night. People gather to watch bats emerge from caves or roosts, creating a natural spectacle.

This tradition combines the spooky allure of bats with an appreciation for the natural world, making it a unique way to celebrate Halloween.

Crazy Halloween traditions around the world

8) Halloween traditions from Ireland – Barmbrack

Ireland, where Halloween originated as Samhain, has its own peculiar tradition involving a baked treat called Barmbrack. Barmbrack is a type of fruitcake baked with various objects inside, each with a specific meaning.

If you find a ring in your slice, it’s believed you’ll soon get married; a coin signifies wealth, and a pea means you won’t marry that year. It’s a tasty fortune-telling tradition that adds a fun element to Irish Halloween celebrations.

9) Halloween traditions from the United Kingdom – Staring Into a Mirror

In the United Kingdom, particularly in Scotland, there’s a tradition that involves staring into a mirror on Halloween night. It is believed that if you do this by candlelight, you might glimpse your future spouse’s face.

However, there’s a spooky twist: Some traditions warn that you might also see a skull or the face of the Grim Reaper, offering a mix of romanticism and the macabre.

10) Halloween traditions from Europe – Carving Turnips

Europeans used turnips before pumpkins became the go-to vegetable for carving in the United States. In particular, the Irish are credited with starting this tradition, and their carved turnips were often more frightening than their modern pumpkin counterparts.

The eerie glow of a candle inside a hollowed-out turnip created a genuinely spooky effect, and this tradition continues to be celebrated in some parts of Europe.

11) Halloween traditions from Austria – Seleenwoche

Austria has a tradition called Seleenwoche, or “All Souls’ Week,” which extends beyond Halloween. During this week, families visit the graves of their loved ones, light candles, and place lanterns to remember the deceased.

The entire experience is a sad yet deeply meaningful way to honor those who have passed away and is a unique facet of Austrian Halloween customs.

12) Halloween traditions from Germany – Hiding Knives

In some parts of Germany, it’s a Halloween tradition to hide all the knives in the house. This practice aims to prevent harm or accidents during the night when spirits are said to roam freely. It’s a superstition that combines Halloween spookiness with a practical safety measure.

13) Halloween traditions from the Czech Republic – Talking To The Dead

In the Czech Republic, Halloween is seen as a time when the boundary between the living and the dead is thin. People gather in cemeteries to visit the graves of their loved ones, often bringing chairs, food, and candles.

They believe that the deceased return to the world of the living on this night and take the opportunity to converse with them. It’s a deeply spiritual and poignant way to connect with the departed.

14) Halloween traditions from Italy – Fave Dei Morti (Beans Of The Dead)

In Italy, a sweet treat known as “Fave Dei Morti,” or “Beans of the Dead,” is made during Halloween. These almond and sugar confections are shaped like white beans and are traditionally prepared to honor deceased loved ones.

The belief is that by consuming these sweets, you share a meal with the departed, creating a heartwarming and delicious connection between the living and the dead.

More spooky Halloween traditions

15) Teng Chieh in China

In China, a holiday similar to Halloween called Teng Chieh or “Lantern Festival” is celebrated on the 15th day of the seventh lunar month. People light lanterns and create elaborate displays to guide the spirits of deceased ancestors back to the living world. Additionally, they place food and other offerings on altars to appease wandering spirits, ensuring a peaceful transition back to the afterlife.

16) Apple Peeling in Scotland

In Scotland, Halloween traditions include various divination rituals. One such ritual involves young people peeling apples and throwing the peel over their shoulders. The shape it forms on the floor is said to reveal the first initial of their future spouse’s name. This practice adds an element of mystery and fun to Scottish Halloween celebrations.

17) Candles and Black Cats in Belgium

Belgium has a unique Halloween tradition where people light candles in memory of deceased family members. Additionally, black cats, often associated with superstition and witchcraft, are considered good luck in Belgian Halloween customs. People believe black cats can protect them from evil spirits, making them an integral part of the holiday.

18) Making of Queimada in Spain

In Spain, particularly in Galicia, there’s a tradition of making a mystical alcoholic drink called “Queimada” during Halloween celebrations. It involves setting the drink on fire and reciting incantations to ward off evil spirits. This fiery spectacle is both a form of entertainment and a way to cleanse the surroundings of negative energy.

19) Food for the Dead in Ecuador

Halloween traditions in Ecuador involve preparing a special feast called “Fanjulán.” This feast includes food and drink offerings for deceased loved ones. Families gather at cemeteries to share meals with the departed, creating a sense of connection and continuity with their ancestors.

20) Haunted Scavenger Hunt in Barcelona

Barcelona, Spain, takes Halloween to the next level with its annual haunted scavenger hunt. Participants are tasked with exploring the city while solving clues and riddles related to local legends and ghost stories. It’s a thrilling and interactive way to celebrate Halloween, combining history, mystery, and the spirit of adventure.

Final words:

Halloween is a holiday that transcends borders and cultures, inspiring a wide range of fascinating traditions around the world. Whether celebrating with a playful zombie crawl in Denver or honoring your ancestors with food offerings in Ecuador, these Halloween traditions around the world reflect the rich tapestry of global beliefs and practices.

So, as the season of spookiness approaches, take a moment to appreciate the weird and wonderful Halloween traditions that make this holiday so unique and captivating.